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Read This Before Giving UP On Carbs Completely

May 14, 2019

Trisha Hodge - Metabolic Mom

The Blood Sugar Story: Sugar & Carbs, How They're Affecting You?


Glycemic this and glycemic that. Does it matter?


You'll notice that they both begin with "glycemic." That's one tip that they have to do with sugars and carbs. Not only how much sugar is in foods, but more importantly, how it affects your blood sugar levels.


In general, diets that are high on the glycemic index (GI) and high in glycemic load (GL), tend to increase the risk of diabetes and heart disease.

Read This Before Giving UP On Carbs Completely

FUN FACT: Starches like those in potatoes and grains are digested into sugar; this is because starch is just a bunch of sugars linked together. Digestive enzymes break those bonds so that the sugars become free. Then those sugars affect your body the same way that eating sugary foods do.

Glycemic Index (“how fast”)

The most common of the two terms is “glycemic index” (GI).


As the name suggests, it "indexes" (or compares) the effect that different foods have on your blood sugar level. Then each food is given a score from 0 (no effect on blood sugar) to 100 (big effect on blood sugar). Foods that cause a fast increase in blood sugar have a high GI. That is because the sugar in them is quickly processed by your digestive system and absorbed into your  


Read This Before Giving UP On Carbs Completely

FUN FACT: Can you guess which food has a GI of higher than 100? (Think of something super-starchy) White potatoes! They have a GI of 111.

Glycemic Load (“how much”)

The glycemic load is different.


Glycemic load (GL) doesn’t take into account how quickly your blood sugar “spikes”, but it looks at how high that spike is. Basically, how much the food increases your blood sugar.


GL depends on two things. First, how much sugar is actually in the food. Second, how much of the food is typically eaten.


Low GL would be 0-10, moderate GL would be 10-20, and high GL would 20+.


Example of GL and GI

So, let’s compare the average (120 g) servings of bananas and oranges:

Excerpt from: Harvard Health Publications, Glycemic index and glycemic load for 100+ foods

As you can see, the banana and orange have almost the same glycemic index.; this means they both raise your blood sugar in about the same amount of time.


But, the average banana raises the blood sugar twice as high (11) as the orange does (5). So, it contains more overall sugar than the same amount (120 g) of orange.


Of course, this is all relative. A GL of 11 is not high at all. Please keep eating whole fruits. :)

Pertaining To Your Health

You've probably heard every health and wellness expert talk about blood sugar at some point, right?


Well, this means it's probably important for your overall health.


While your body has mechanisms in place to maintain stable blood sugar, there are many nutrition and lifestyle strategies that you can implement to help it out. Maintaining stable blood sugar will improve your overall physical and mental health.

Stabilizing Blood Sugar

Oh, the words "blood sugar."


Does it conjure up visions of restrictive eating, diabetes medications, or insulin injections?


Blood sugar is the measure of the amount of sugar in your blood. You need the right balance of sugar in your blood to fuel your brain and muscles.


The thing is, it can fluctuate. A lot.


This fluctuation is the natural balance between things that increase it; and things that decrease it. When you eat food with sugars or starches ("carbs"), then your digestive system absorbs sugar into your blood. When carbs are ingested and broken down into simple sugars, your body keeps blood sugar levels stable by secreting insulin. Insulin allows excess sugar to get it out of your bloodstream and into your muscle cells and other tissues for energy.


Your body wants your blood sugar to be at an optimal level. It should be high enough, so you're not light-headed, fatigued, and irritable. It should be low enough that your body isn't scrambling to remove excess from the blood.


When blood sugar is too low, this is referred to as "hypoglycemia."


When blood sugar is too high, it is referred to as hyperglycemia. Prolonged periods of elevated blood sugar levels (chronic hyperglycemia) can lead to "insulin resistance."


Insulin resistance is when your cells are just so bored with the excess insulin that they start ignoring (resisting) it, and that keeps your blood sugar levels too high.


Insulin resistance and chronic hyperglycemia can eventually lead to diabetes.


So let’s look at how you can optimize your food and lifestyle to keep your blood sugar stable.


Food To Stabilize Blood Sugar


The simplest thing to do to balance your blood sugar is to reduce the number of refined sugars and starches you eat. To do this, you can start by dumping sweet drinks and having smaller portions of dessert.


Eating more fiber is helpful too. Fiber helps to slow down the amount of sugar absorbed from your meal; it reduces the "spike" in your blood sugar level. Fiber is found in plant-based foods (as long as they are eaten in their natural state, processing foods removed fiber). Eating nuts, seeds, and whole fruits and veggies (not juiced) is a great way to increase your fiber intake.

Read This Before Giving UP On Carbs Completely

FUN FACT: Cinnamon has been shown to help cells increase insulin sensitivity. Not to mention it’s a delicious spice that can be used in place of sugar. (HINT: It’s in the recipe below)

Lifestyle To Stabilize Blood Sugar


Exercise also helps to improve your insulin sensitivity; this means that your cells don't ignore insulin's call to get excess sugar out of the blood. Not to mention, when you exercise, your muscles are using up that sugar they absorbed from your blood. But you already knew that exercise is healthy, didn't you?


Would you believe that stress affects your blood sugar levels? Yup! Stress hormones increase your blood sugar levels. If you think about the "fight or flight" stress response, what fuel do your brain and muscles need to "fight" or "flee"? Sugar! When you are stressed signals are sent to release stored forms of sugar back into the bloodstream, increasing blood sugar levels. So, try to reduce the stress you're under and manage it more effectively. Simple tips are meditation, deep breathing, or gentle movement.


Sleep goes hand-in-hand with stress. When you don't get enough quality sleep, you tend to release stress hormones, have a higher appetite, and even get sugar cravings. Sleep is crucial, often overlooked, factor when it comes to keeping your blood sugar stable. Make sleep more of a priority - it will do your blood sugar (and the rest of your physical and mental health) good.

Read This Before Giving UP On Carbs Completely

Your body is on a constant 24-hour quest to keep your blood sugar stable. The body has mechanisms in place to do this, but those mechanisms can get tired (resistant). Long-term blood sugar issues can spell trouble.


There are many nutrition and lifestyle approaches you can take to help keep your blood sugar stable. Minimizing excessive carbs, and eating more fiber, exercising, reducing stress, and improving sleep are all key to having stable blood sugar (and overall good health).


Read This Before Giving UP On Carbs Completely

When too much sugar is found in your blood stream all at once, too much insulin is release which takes all that sugar out and ends up storing it as fat.



Now your blood sugar is too LOW causing you to crave and need MORE of the fast digesting sugar flooding floods to bring it back up quickly.

THIS IS A VICIOUS BLOOD SUGAR CYCLE YOU'RE STUCK IN RIGHT NOW AND IT'S WHY YOU CAN'T ACTUALLY LOSE FAT AND WHY YOU KEEP CRAVING THE "JUNK" FOOD.

Mediterranean Salad (Low GI)

Serves 2


1 cucumber, chopped

½ cup chickpeas, drained and rinsed

½ cup black olives

¼ red onion, diced

½ cup cherry tomatoes, halved

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

1 tbsp apple cider vinegar

2 tbsp lemon juice

1 tsp garlic

1 tsp basil

½ tsp oregano

1 dash sea salt

1 dash black pepper


Place first five ingredients together in a bowl.


Add remaining ingredients to a jar (to make the dressing) with a tight-fitting lid and shake vigorously.


Add dressing to salad and gently toss.


Serve & enjoy!


Tip: Add chopped avocado for even more fiber and healthy fat.